Greater Familiarity Leads to Greater Concern for the Ocean

Recently, ODFW revisited survey data collected in a 2016 visitor survey to dig deeper and learn more about Oregon coastal visitors. The goal was to use more advanced statistical methods to see if we could use visitor characteristics to predict how much a visitor knows or thinks that they know about the ocean. Read More

A Natural Laboratory for Social Science Research

Over the past several years, researchers studying people’s reactions to Oregon’s marine reserves have begun to understand the complex values and experiences that underpin how different communities interact with the ocean in different ways. Many insights from our ongoing human dimensions research centers on the importance of recognizing how and why different stakeholders interact with and value the ocean in different ways. Read More

Returning To The Reserves: Lars Robison

With a profession spanning five decades off of a 15-mile stretch of coastline, this charter boat captain’s sense of place for the Cascade Head Marine Reserve area remains deep and unchanged. Join us as we talk with Lars Robison and explore his knowledge of the reserve, how he came to know these waters, and his continued connections with this place. Read More

Returning to the Reserves

People’s experiences with the ocean – the smell of salt, the spray of waves, the rolling storms and the stunning calms — have a way of creating a sense of connectedness. Read more about our upcoming series that looks at different people’s sense of place and their different connections with the ocean. Read More

Competing Values in Conservation

How do you measure tradeoffs when comparing positive outcomes for one group of people versus the negative outcomes to another? Creating a new wilderness area, designating a wild and scenic river, or creating marine reserves all provide conservation benefits. However, there are tradeoffs. Read More